The Snowy Day

I struck homeschooling gold this week! While planning through the Before Five In A Row curriculum I’m currently using with Hudi, I had scheduled to read The Snowy Day this week. I wanted so badly to be able to have a hands on experience, but there was no way  I could coordinate his curriculum schedule with the weather way back in June (when I was doing the planning). To add on to the struggle, it doesn’t snow here. Not really. We get maybe one or two ice storms a year, and every few years we might get one decent snow (decent being about  1-2 inches of powder). So I took a chance and picked a random week in January, since that was the most likely month (other than February) we’d see snow.

It honestly feels like G-d has blessed our homeschool endeavors, because this was the week we had snow! Not just ice like we normally expect, but about an inch or two of fluffy powder to play in! I had hoped all year (well, since June) for the off chance of this happening, and to my extreme delight it did!

Around here, everything shuts down at just the mildest snow/ice “storm”. It’s not that southerner’s can’t handle the weather (as much as us yankees like to joke about that). It’s the fact that we see so little of winter weather, there’s no point in maintaining the supplies and equipment necessary to keep roads safe.

Growing up in Chicago we had an entire season to space out all of winter’s homey charm. Here we have to jam pack it into the one day a year we see snow. Being stuck at home means you don’t have anywhere to be, which frees you up to spend the day on all the comfy and fun things that make this season special.

Our snow day fun actually started yesterday while we were still keeping an eye on weather reports, and crossing our fingers for a good snowfall. As part of Hudi’s school we did “snow painting”, which was an incredibly easy activity using staple ingredients.

2878756When the snow finally did come the next day (today) we woke up to eat breakfast (french toast), and bundled ourselves up to go play outside. Hudi immediately made the connection between playing in the snow and his book. Just like Peter in The Snowy Day, he made tracks with a stick, attempted to build a snowman, and enjoyed snow ball fights (which was his favorite activity). I also got a little artsy and took his paints outside. There was nothing special about it…I just let him paint the snow! Why this isn’t a more common activity, I don’t know, but we had a whole yard of natural white canvas, so why not?

When we came inside we warmed ourselves up with an incredibly delicious cup of hot chocolate. Candy Land was played over a bowl of homemade chicken noodle soup (I keep that recipe to myself…sorry!). We then collected up the bowls we had set out earlier and made snow cream (3 different varieties!).

After spending some time inside, we eventually bundled ourselves up once more and headed back out. More snowballs were tossed at each other, and we took an evening stroll around the block. Our day began to settle down in front of the gas logs, where we had an indoor picnic dinner (once again…homemade chicken noodle soup).

It was exactly what you dream of when you envision a snow day. I’m hoping tomorrow (since this is a rare occasion when the snow isn’t melting within 24 hours apparently) we can make homemade pretzels.

So…the instructions for snow painting, the hot chocolate, and the snow cream we had today…

2878756

Snow Painting
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup salt
Dark construction paper
Paint brushes

Mix the flour, salt, and water together until it’s well combined and forms a sort of paste. This activity is as simple as painting the mixture onto paper. Dark construction paper works best! The final product looks like snow!

2878756

Chocolate Hazelnut Hot Chocolate

Ingredients
8 cups milk
1 cup heavy cream
8 TBS nutella
4 TBS unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups brown sugar

Directions
In a large saucepan, mix all of the ingredients until well combined. This can also be mixed in a crock pot and left to heat for as long as it takes to warm up enough to be enjoyed.

We definitely used the crock pot so that it could be ready when we came in from the snow!

Garnished with whipped cream, chocolate shavings, and sprinkles!

2878756

Snow Cream – Basic Recipe

Ingredients 
8 cups of snow
1 – 14oz can sweetened condensed milk
1-3 tsp vanilla

Instructions
Place a bowl outside during a snowfall. To get even more snow, place multiple bowls outside. After a few hours, bring your bowls inside. If you had a few inches of snow, you can also collect the top layer of snow directly from the ground…assuming it’s clean. Have your ingredients ready to go before you bring in the snow, since you’re going to want to work rather quickly before it melts.

For a basic snow cream, add in one can of sweetened condensed milk, and vanilla. You can also add some sugar (white or brown!).

Be gentle with stirring (more like a churn), since you don’t want the snow to melt too quickly.

You can also get creative with your flavors. Simply use the basic recipe as a base, and add any variety of other ingredients. The two other flavors we tried today were…

Chocolate peanut butter: We mixed in a few tablespoons of chocolate syrup, and about three large spoonfuls of peanut butter.

We also created a “bourbon Italian sweet cream” flavor. I poured a little bit (maybe half a cup) of Italian sweet cream coffee cream into the mix, as well as torani bourbon caramel flavoring. I’d suggest maybe 1-2 tablespoons. This one was probably my favorite of the three!

Advertisements

Lavender Maple Vanilla Sufanyot

I love Hanukkah. A celebration of miracles. The warm glow of candles for 8 nights in a row. Oh, and fried food. Let’s be honest, the fried food is a major highlight. After kicking off the first night my house now has a delicious leftover smell that reminds me of the state fair. For dinner we had latke grilled cheese sandwiches, which I’ve established as a family tradition since I discovered the idea last year. That scrumptiousness was then followed by sufganiyot (Israeli donuts). We also may have slipped in a few pieces of  cheap gelt after some dreidle playing. No one ever claimed Hanukkah was about health, and I’m perfectly okay with that.

It had taken me a couple years to figure out all of the tips and tricks to frying, but once I got the hang of it I immediately began playing around with various flavor combinations and recipes (hence the latke grilled cheese sandwiches). This year I continued my interest in experimenting with lavender, and decided to try out a jelly concoction in my first round of sufganiyot.

I’m happy to say that it turned out to be quite enjoyable, and the flavor paired excellently with the donuts. I used one full jar of the jelly for  donuts, and the rest is going to be given away as gifts. Pretty soon I’m definitely going to make another batch!

So…how to make these things…

For The Jelly

Ingredients
3 1/2 cups water
1/2 cup lavender buds
1 tsp cardamom
1 lemon
1 envelope of pectin
1/2 cup maple syrup
1 vanilla bean
4 cups sugar

Directions
Bring water to boil in a large saucepan over high heat. Once the water reaches a boil, take the pan off of the heat and add lavender. Cover pot, and let it steep for 20 minutes.

After 20 minutes, strain the mixture through a cheesecloth or other fine mesh cloth into a deep pot. Discard the lavender buds.

Stir in the juice of the lemon and pectin until the pectin is completely dissolved.  Add the maple syrup and vanilla bean.

Bring the mixture to a rolling boil, and add sugar. Return the mixture to a rolling boil. Stirring occasionally, allow it to boil for about 3 minutes.

To determine the consistency of the jelly, and whether or not it has cooked enough, use “the spoon test”. Keep a metal spoon in cold water nearby. Dip the spoon into the boiling mixture. If the jelly runs off of the spoon, keep cooking it for a little longer. If it turns to a “jelly” consistency when the spoon is lifted out of the pot, it’s done.

For The Sufganiyot

Ingredients 
2 cups flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 packet of yeast (or 2 1/4 teaspoons)
1/2 salt
2 large egg yolks
3/4 cup heavy cream
2 tbs butter
6 cups canola oil (plus more for coating a bowl)
Jam or jelly
powdered sugar

Directions
Combine flour, sugar, yeast, and salt in a bowl. Add yolks and milk, and mix until dough is shaggy. Add butter and continue to mix until dough is smooth.

Coat a large bowl with oil. Form dough into a ball, and roll in the bowl until it is covered in oil. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth or plastic wrap, and allow dough to rise for 1 1/2 hours.

When dough is done rising, coat a baking sheet or cutting board with flour. Roll out the dough until it’s about 1/4 inch thickness. Using a round cookie cutter (about 2 inches around) or the rim of a cup, cut out as many rounds as possible. Take the leftover dough and roll it out again to redo the process until all of the dough is used.

Lay out the cut out rounds on a baking sheet. Loosely cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap, and allow to rise for 30 minutes.

While the dough is rising, heat the 6 cups of oil in a dutch oven or heavy bottom pot. The temperature of the oil should reach about 350 degrees.

When the dough is done rising, pick up a round with a spatula (not your fingers, as this can deflate the donut). Drop them into the oil to cook. Once the bottom of the donuts are browned, flip them over using a fork. Once completely cooked, lift them out of the oil and place them on a baking sheet lined with a paper towel.

Once the donuts are finished cooling, pour jelly into a piping bag. Puncture the side of the donuts, and squeeze about a teaspoon of jelly into the donuts.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar, and enjoy!

2878756

Rose Jelly

I have been working with some unique flavors lately.  First it was the lavender cupcakes with honey frosting, and then it was the lavender cookies with rosewater icing. Both recipes gave me an opportunity to work with interesting ingredients, and they turned out to be quite delicious.

Since my husband and I conducted a few experiments with pectin in the kitchen one night, I have been wanting to try my hand at making my own jams. There was one jelly in particular I was looking to try, but I was missing one of the core ingredients.

Today, however, as I stepped outside on my way to the store I noticed that my rose bush was starting to bloom. How is that related to our jelly experiments in the kitchen? Well, it’s the ingredient I have been missing for this new recipe I wanted to try.

I love adventures, and that includes the kind I experience standing over a stove, so the idea of using flower petals in cooking was something I was more than willing to try.

And the great thing is that it turned out to be pretty delicious! My toddler and I shared some on a piece of toast, and he declared it to be “so yummy” and his “favorite” (along with the millions of other things that are currently his “favorite”, but hey, he’s still learning what that word means).

Ingredients
2 cups rose petals (fresh, and not treated with chemicals)
2 cups water
2 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
6 oz liquid pectin (2 pouches)
2 tbs rosewater

Directions

Bring water to a boil in a small saucepan. Tale pan off heat, and pour in petals. Cover and let steep for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes, strain the water into a medium sized sauce pan. Discard the petals. Add sugar and lemon juice to the water. This is a good time to put a spoon in the freezer, which will be explained later.

Bring the water to a boil, and let boil for two minutes. Add in the pectin.

This is where the spoon will come in handy. Let the water boil for about 5 minutes. Take the spoon out of the freezer for the “chilled spoon test”. Give the pan a quick stir with the spoon. If the mixture runs off of the spoon, it isn’t done. If some of the mixture sticks to the spoon, but is still runny, it needs a little more time. If it completely sticks to the spoon like jelly, it’s done.

Give the mix as long as it needs on the stove, conducting the spoon test every 2 minutes or so.

When the jelly is finally done, take the pan off of the heat and stir in the rosewater. Pour jelly into prepared mason jars and allow the mixture time to harden into jelly.

Enjoy!

Lavender Cookies With Rosewater Icing

Someday I’m going to have a Jane Austen themed ladies night where my friends and I will dress elegantly, giggle over tea and crumpets, and watch Pride and Prejudice. It is going to be splendid.

I’m also going to make this brand new recipe I’ve tried out today. It is so deliciously appropriate for a tea party like gathering, and it reminds me of something I would eat while chilling with the Bennet sisters.  Until then, however, our friends who join us for a monthly Bible study will be enjoying these uniquely flavored cookies over our discussions.

I’ve been experimenting a lot with lavender lately since I have such a huge bag of it sitting in my cabinet (no matter how much I use, that bag seems to remain constantly full!) . A couple months ago I made lavender cupcakes with honey frosting, and this past week I created lavender hamentashen with rosewater jelly for Purim. It’s a very unique flavor that isn’t widely used, but once I started working with it regularly I realized that it really brings a wonderful touch to baked goods. Not only that, but it smells so incredibly fresh and scrumptious it becomes rather comforting to work with.

What You Need:
(For The cookies)
1/2 cup melted butter
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 tbs lavender (chopped finely)
1 1/2 cups flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt

(For The Icing)
3cups powdered sugar (possibly more)
6 tsp water
6 tsp rose water

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Combine melted butter, sugar, and eggs into a bowl. Gently stir in lavender. Add flour, baking powder and salt.

Spoon cookie dough onto well oiled cookie sheets. Bake for 10 minutes.

While cookies are baking, prepare the icing by combining powder sugar, water, and rosewater. If the consistency is too runny, add more powder sugar.

Once cookies are out of the oven and cooled, spread icing over cookies. A little goes a long way since the icing is going to be rather strong (you can adjust the strength of the flavor by adding more or less rosewater to the icing recipe).

Lavender Cupcakes With Honey Frosting

I love food adventures. New flavors and unique ingredients are part of the fun in being kitchen savvy. It’s an even better experience when you’re sharing new and delicious creations with people you love. It’s simple math in my book: Food = love.

The social circles I run in tend to be rather clever and creative with their food, and I love having a high bar to challenge me. Whenever I’m tasked with feeding these people it provides me with the opportunity to try new things that I otherwise wouldn’t attempt, and more often than not that attitude is reciprocated. It’s a very beautiful relationship.

While preparing for a recent young adults fellowship in our home, I was greatly inspired to use the bag of lavender buds I have sitting in my pantry. I originally purchased the bag to make lavender infused milk, which I hoped at the time would assist in our toddler’s bedtime routine (since lavender has a calming effect). The awesome thing about this purchase is the fact that 1) the bag is rather large and 2) It’s very strong, and therefor a little goes a long way. Ergo, I have a lot left over.

So I decided I would try using it in baking, and decided that our gathering would be the perfect excuse to give it a go. The cupcakes I settled on making turned out to be delicious, and I had no leftovers after everyone left.

Now, I just need to discover what else I could incorporate lavender in.

 

For the cupcakes you will need:
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
2 1/2 tbs lavender buds (finally chopped)
2/3 cup cold milk

For the frosting you will need:
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
8 oz cream cheese, softened
4 cups powdered sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract
2 tbs honey (plus more to drizzle if you wish)

Directions:
1) Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. and line a muffin tin with cupcake liners. Soften the butter and sugar together with an electric mixer. Add eggs one at a time, and then the vanilla. If you want to make the cupcakes a purple color for appearance, this would be a good time to add half and half of blue and red food coloring.

2) In a separate bowl stir together flour, baking powder, and salt. Stir lavender buds into mix (make sure they are as finely chopped as possible, otherwise you will have chunks of lavender in the cupcakes).

3) Combine the two mixtures, and add milk.

4) Pour batter into the prepared muffin tin, and bake for 20 minutes.

For the Frosting:
Beat the butter and cream cheese together until well mixed. Adding 1 cup at a time, beat in the powdered sugar. Once the frosting is smooth and creamy, add in the vanilla and honey.

2878756

Seven Species Muffins

I am a firm believer in the saying “without tradition, our lives would be as shaky as a fiddler on a roof“, and as my husband and I continue to build our home I find myself relying heavily on tradition for help. Growing up in a secular household I only had speckles of traditions here and there, but nothing particularly concrete or foundational. It was more along the lines of routine rather than tradition.  When I came to Messianic Judaism as a young adult, I suddenly entered into a world overflowing with traditions. As Tevye the dairyman in Fiddler On The Roof elaborates: “we have traditions for everything! How to sleep, how to eat, how to work, how to wear clothes…“, and that is no exaggeration. In Judaism there is a way to confront anything and everything in life. How to mourn, how to celebrate, how to face the big and important stuff, and how to get through everyday routines. Having transitioned from a life without traditions into a life overwhelmed with them, I very clearly realize the importance of keeping them alive whether they be great or small. With the traditions I’ve eagerly taken a hold of as my own I find myself on a steady surface that helps hold me upright while the world around me seems unsteady and shaky. As a mother trying to raise her child to be righteous and G-dly, I am in great need of such steadiness.

While I try to incorporate certain traditions into the nooks and crannies of the everyday, holidays are perhaps most dominated by traditions. One of my favorite things about Judaism is the fact that these holidays are almost always observed kinesthetically. On Rosh Hashanah we blow shofars. On Yom Kippur we fast. On Sukkot we build and dwell in sukkot. On Hanukkah we light the menorah. On Purim we literally reenact the book of Esther, and on Pesach we go through the motions of Israel’s escape from Egypt during the seder.

And then there are minor holidays such as Tu B’shevat, which is the “new year for trees”. While it was once a day used to calculate agricultural cycles, it quickly became a sort of Jewish Earth Day. While I’m not particularly hyper with go-green sentiments, I do appreciate nature as G-d’s creation, and I most certainly believe it is our responsibility to tend and enjoy it. Even more important to me is the fostering of a culture which we now deeply connect with, even for the minor stuff. So this year Tu B’shevat was on my radar.

I was then left with a question of how to observe. After an ice storm we couldn’t plant trees as is tradition to do. I have a strong aversion toward “Tu B’shevat sedars”, and while it is completely appropriate to donate money toward planting a tree in Israel, it isn’t something my toddler could be involved in.

So I went with two activities that gave a nod toward the day (three if you count watching the Tu B’shevat episode of Shalom Sesame). First we planted my son’s very first herb garden which included cilantro, parsley (hopefully to be used at our seder in a few months), chives, and oregano. We placed the containers in front of a large window at my son’s level so they continue to be his responsibility and enjoyment.

Of course, like almost all other holidays (with the exception of Yom Kippur), there is  traditional food to be prepared. With Tu B’shevat it is customary to eat a new fruit and/or the seven species of Israel (wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives, and honey, which is all derived from Deut. 8:8). Originally I wanted to make a full meal that incorporated all of these elements, but ironically enough our ice storm had us locked in the house a couple days prior to Tu B’shevat, and that had me hustling at the last minute.

I ended up going with one recipe that included all seven elements, and it was delicious. My toddler enjoyed helping since there was plenty for him to pour and mix. It’s a simple enough process, though I did have to grind my own barley flour since my regular groceries store didn’t carry it (I found the grain in the Mexican aisle though!).

The result was delicious, and definitely something I will continue to do every year.
A nice little way to celebrate a nice little holiday. A new tradition.

Ingredients
3/4 cup golden raisins
1/2 cup dried figs
1/2 cup dates
1 1/4 cup whole milk
1/4 cup applesauce
1 tbs cinnamon
1 tsp all spice
2 eggs
1/3 cup olive oil
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 cup barley flour
1 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup pomegranate seeds
honey as a spread

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Chop up dates and figs and put them in a blender or food processor along with milk, applesauce, cinnamon, and allspice. Blend until the consistency is smooth and thick. Set aside.

In a bowl mix eggs, olive oil, sugars, and the vanilla. Set aside.

In a separate bowl, mix the flours, baking soda, and salt. Toss in the pomegranate seeds until they are well coated.

Pour the blended fig/date mixture into the flour mix and stir until well blended. Add the egg mixture.

Fold in the raisins

Spray a muffin tin with cooking spray, and spoon in batter. Place prepared muffin sheet in the oven, and immediately turn heat down to 375 degrees F.

Bake for 23 minutes.

When muffins are cool, cut in half and spread honey in the middle of them.

Enjoy!

Coconut Oil Chocolate Chip Cookies

Coconut oil seems to be all the rage right now. It’s on everyone’s health radar, and is currently expected to save the world if I had to guess based on the massive coconut oil advocacy out there. Like most health food fads I reacted rather critically at first, and eventually found myself somewhere down the middle of the spectrum.

As it turns out coconut oil really does provide a lot of benefits, some of which could help my family’s specific health concerns. On the other hand I also find it super important not to get carried away.  It isn’t a cure for a chronic illness, and although virgin coconut oil isn’t the same type of coconut oil that was once said to raise cholesterol levels back in the 80’s, there is a concern over what it could do as far as it’s contribution to heart disease. As with most foods in life, moderation is the key factor.

With that said, let’s be honest about my true feelings regarding coconut oil: It simply tastes good.

I cringe at the idea of going gluten free. I have no desire to even imagine going paleo. And I’m not going to start slashing certain ingredients like dairy and sugar out of my diet (again, moderation is key). So I tend to be the odd one out among my crunchy friends.

With coconut oil I can at least look like I’m somewhat crunchy, and little do they know my true intentions have nothing to do with health, but everything to do with taste.

These cookies are an example of that….

 

Ingredients
3/4 cup melted coconut oil
3/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
2 cups flour
1 pkg vanilla pudding (unprepared)
1 tsp baking soda
1 bag of chocolate chips

Directions
1) In a large bowl, beat together coconut oil, sugars, egg, and vanilla.

2) Slowly add flour, pudding mix, and baking soda. Beat together. Dough will be dry and shaggy, which is fine.

3) Fold in chocolate chips.

4) Scoop dough out of the bowl (about 1/4 cup at a time) and compress into mounds with your hands. If dough is too crumby and you cannot form it drizzle in some melted coconut oil, but be careful not to make the dough too sticky and oily. Place cookies on a plate, cover with foil or plastic, and place in fridge for 3 hours (or up to 5 days).

5) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake cookies for 11 minutes, and them let them cool on cookie sheet for another 10 minutes (it’s a good practice to slightly under cook cookies in the oven, and let them finish cooking on the baking sheet outside of the oven).

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies

I had been wanting to try these cookies for weeks. August came to an end, September was in full swing, and I couldn’t find the time to make them. Being a few days past my due date, I was getting rather restless and eventually decided that it was now or never for these cookies.

Well, the day I had planned to make them started with a doctor’s visit to my OB for a non-stress test. Apparently I was having contractions without even realizing it. After speaking to the practice’s midwife, I was under the impression that baby would be coming soon, but not soon enough (in my opinion of what “soon enough” meant). I was sure we would end up going in for our scheduled induction the next day. I sent my husband to work, assuring him that I would keep count of the contractions and let him know when he needed to come home. If he needed to.

My day was spent sitting around the house playing Minecraft, and timing my contractions. I was still determined to make these cookies later that night. About 4PM I started to time contractions at 10 minutes apart, and while they still weren’t strong enough to make me consider the fact that I was in labor, I did feel them a little more than I had before.

After my husband came home, there was a lot of waiting around. Eventually I wanted to go to the grocery store, much to my husbands amusement, to buy a sugar pumpkin. Didn’t I say I wanted to make cookies?  So we went to the grocery store while I continued to count contractions, and we bought a sugar pumpkin.

I baked the pumpkin, scooped the pulp out, pureed it, and then worked on the cookies…all while counting contractions every 6-7 minutes.

My husband was betting on a 3AM hospital run. I rolled my eyes because I was convinced it was false labor.

The cookies were made, and they were delicious. At midnight I realized that I wasn’t going to be able to sleep, and we started getting ready to go. Our baby boy was coming.

So obviously these cookies are very near and dear to my heart. They are the infamous cookies I baked while in labor. And I hope you enjoy them as much as we did.

Ingredients: 
1 sugar pumpkin
3 tbs mayonnaise
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 cup white sugar
2 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp all spice
1 tsp milk
1 tbs vanilla
1 bag of chocolate chips

Directions

1) Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Make pumpkin puree by opening up the pumpkin and scooping out the insides (discard seeds and stringy stuff). Cut the pumpkin into pieces, and place on cookie sheet inside part facing down. Bake for about 45 minutes. Scoop pulp away from skin and toss in a blender to puree.

2) In a large bowl, mix 1 cup of pumpkin puree, mayonnaise, vegetable oil, and sugar.

3) In a separate bowl, mix flour, baking powder, all spice, and milk. Pour into pumpkin mix. Stir until well blended. Add vanilla and chocolate chips.

4) Bake at 350 degrees F. for 11 minutes

Zucchini Cupcakes

I love fall. It is my favorite season for a number of reasons. The smells are delightful, and the tastes are even better. As soon as we enter into the final days of August, I begin searching for recipes that help satisfy my autumn taste buds.  Pumpkin spice only goes so far.

This year my first attempt at capturing fall through my work in the kitchen was a complete success. I took on “zucchini cupcakes”, which were absolutely delicious and tasted very much like this wonderful season.

Ingredients:
(Cupcakes)
3 eggs
1 1/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup veggie oil
1/2 cup orange juice
1 tsp almond extract
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground cloves
1 zucchini, shredded (I don’t have an exact amount for you, but I would guess 1 cup would be a nice try)

(Frosting)
1 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup butter
1/4 cup milk
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 1/2-2 cups powdered sugar

Instructions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large bowl beat: eggs, sugar, veggie oil, orange juice, and almond extract.
In a separate bowl combine: flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cloves.
Mix the contents of the bowls together. Add zucchini

Fill paper lined muffin cups about 2/3 full. Bake for 20-25 minutes (I baked at 21, and they were great).

While cakes are baking, combine brown sugar, butter, and milk in a sauce pan. Bring to boil over medium heat. Cook for 2 minutes while stirring. It should get a little thickened.

Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Let cool until it’s lukewarm, then stir in powdered sugar until it’s the consistency of frosting.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑